Added cognitive demand from increased sensorimotor complexity resulted in better goal-directed movement following stroke: a novel finding in post-stroke recovery

Authors

  • Catherine R. Lowrey Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada - lowrey@queensu.ca https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8379-9924
  • Sean P. Dukelow Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0609-981X
  • Kimberly D. Moore Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0973-7853
  • Stephen H. Scott Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada; Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada; Providence Care Hospital, Kingston, Ontario, Canada https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8252-7233
  • Benjamin R. Ritsma Providence Care Hospital, Kingston, Ontario, Canada; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada - ritsmab@providencecare.ca https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3472-0271

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.20338/bjmb.v18i1.378

Keywords:

Stroke, Reaching, Pontine, Thalamus, Case report

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Stroke often causes impairments in goal-directed movements, which are commonly assessed using goal-directed reaching tasks. Here we present two individuals post-stroke who performed two robotic reaching tasks: 1. Visually Guided Reaching (VGR); reaching a cursor representing the fingertip to virtual targets, 2. Reverse Visually Guided Reaching (RVGR); where the cursor moves in the opposite direction of hand motion, requiring a novel cognitive rule. Participants are typically more successful at reaching targets in the simple VGR task compared to the more complex RVGR task (~92% of our database). The two cases are notable as they performed better on RVGR compared to VGR.

CASE DESCRIPTIONS: Case 1: 80-year-old patient with left hemorrhagic thalamic stroke, with interventricular extension, presenting with right hemiparesis/reduced motor control. They were unable to complete reaches to any targets in VGR (0/40 targets), but were able to reach ~30% of the targets (15/48) in RVGR.  Case 2: 76-year-old patient with a left ischemic pontine stroke, presenting with right hemiparesis/reduced motor control. They were unable to complete reaches to any targets in VGR (0/40) but were able to reach ~60% of the targets in RVGR (29/48).

INTERPRETATION: Better performance in RVGR compared to VGR may be associated with a “dual-task benefit” and has potential clinical implications, including informing neuro-rehabilitative strategies, potentially by including tasks with added complexity or cognitive components. These findings also highlight the utility of robotic tools to provide novel environments within which to identify unique patterns of impairments and abilities. 

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Published

2024-04-27

How to Cite

Lowrey, C. R., Dukelow, S. P., Moore, K. D., Scott, S. H., & Ritsma, B. R. (2024). Added cognitive demand from increased sensorimotor complexity resulted in better goal-directed movement following stroke: a novel finding in post-stroke recovery. Brazilian Journal of Motor Behavior, 18(1). https://doi.org/10.20338/bjmb.v18i1.378

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Research Notes articles

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